duncan & nugget

Duncan and Nugget were bred at a farm that planned to raise them for meat. The sow died during the birth, and the farmer asked for community members to foster and bottle feed the piglets. A kind woman bottle fed and fell in love with the two piglets. She worked at a school, so she took them back and forth everyday to allow the children and pigs to bond. When it was time for the pigs to be weaned, she could not bear the thought of them going to slaughter, so she negotiated with the farmer to bring them to us instead. They are intelligent pigs with a great sense of humor. They love visitors– except the vet! Their favorite pastimes are taking long walks and getting belly rubs. Nugget is extremely laid back, and he is quick to forgive. Duncan, on the other hand, is a bit more sensitive and emotional. You can tell Duncan from Nugget by his eyes, they are larger and he has darker skin around them, like eye shadow.

hannah jane

Hannah Jane came to Indraloka after being rescued from the 2016 Kaporos ritual in New York City. The Orthodox Jewish ritual, in which innocent beings are spun around in circles overhead and then slaughtered, their bodies then left on the streets or thrown into garbage cans, happens every year on the open streets of the city, despite the fact that it not only breaks several laws, but is unfathomably cruel to these poor beings. Indraloka was fortunate enough to be able to save Hannah Jane along with 32 of her friends from that horrible fate. Hannah and her friends now enjoy their days of freedom with the sun on their backs, the grass between their toes, and the warm love that they have always deserved.

Daisy

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Miss Daisy was just one of countless little ducklings for sale at a reptile show. Yes, she was for sale to be fed by attendees at the show to the reptiles on display.

One attendee bought Daisy to spare her from such a fate and took her home to live with her. Daisy grew up with a wonderful family, living as an indoor duck for a while until her family understood that she needed to be a real duck, with other winged friends and ponds to swim around in.

The family brought Daisy to Indraloka where she immediately settled in and became best friends with Ophelia, who waddles busily around with Daisy all day and night, swimming, chatting, and generally flapping about.

Daisy’s family visits her often.

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Hubub

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Sweet Hubub was born to a goat breeding farm, where males are sent to slaughter and females are saved to breed. Hubub was a simple rescue as all we had to do was ask to save his life, and fortunately he was spared to come and live out his days with his new family at Indraloka.

Hubub’s family are horses; he lives with them in the stalls and pastures and grazes grass with them day in and day out, occasionally standing majestically upon a small hill or rock to remind himself that he is, in fact, a goat.

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Selick

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Selick and friends came from a dark, dangerous, and dirty barn where they were left without food or water. In desperation, many of the pigs turned on each other.

A humane police officer was able to get a court order to seize all 55 pigs kept in the barn. Indraloka stepped in to support the police officer, who did not have experience moving farm animals. We coordinated trailers and volunteers, helped her seek adoptive homes, and took the four in the worst shape home to the sanctuary.

Selick is one of those four, and as you can see, he now enjoys beautiful days and posing for the camera.

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Majja the fabu

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Majja the Fabu was found wandering around a neighborhood one winter, bedraggled and with an injured leg. The people of the neighborhood asked us to take him, and we gladly did so.

His name is the Tibetan word for Peacock (we added the ‘fabu’ because he is exactly that!).

Majja witches over everything at the sanctuary, and cries out an alarm if anything untoward seems to be occurring. Wise and kind with an otherworldly beauty, Majja is truly someone you should meet.

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Anahat

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Anahat was just another “nuisance” wandering a nearby neighborhood. We were called to fetch her and bring her to Indraloka where she has been a thrill and a joy to have around!

Anahat makes her presence very well known by honking loudly when she has anything to say (which is ALL the time). She’s a curious and brave little goose, always looking to be in the middle of the action.

Anahat enjoys long walks and runs with our volunteers where she likes to spread her wings to take off for more vigorous “exercise.”

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Jeremiah

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When Jeremiah came to us, we weren’t sure whether he was going to live. Sometimes this happens and we have to remind ourselves that our job is to provide the best care and as much love, no matter the prognosis. Like many others, we did this for Jeremiah, and because of his will and determination, he survived.

Read more about Jeremiah!

Today, Jeremiah thrives, beaming with those peaceful eyes at every animal and visitor to the sanctuary. He lives with three other large pigs in a pasture and has settled happily in his home. He brings us joy and laughter and we love him dearly.

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Ogie

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Ogemaa (Ogie, for short) was about to be sold to a veal farm when we were lucky enough to be able to intervene. He and his brother, Nandi, came to us at only a day old.

Ogemaa is named after a dear friend of the sanctuary’s founder, an Anishinaabe medicine man who crossed over just as Ogie was born. Ogemaa means “Chief”, and Ogie takes his name very seriously!

From the beginning, Ogie was (and continues to be) high energy and assertive. We were overjoyed to bottle feed the two for as long as we could.

Today, nearly full grown, the steers tower over us, but in our eyes they will always be our babies. Ogie prefers sweet apples and back rubs from his cow friend, Snuffleupagus.

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Blue

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Blue was born from Ming Nau, one of four pigs that came from a dark, dangerous, and dirty barn where they were left without food or water. In desperation, many of the pigs turned on each other.

A humane police officer was able to get a court order to seize all 55 pigs kept in the barn. Indraloka stepped in to support the police officer, who did not have experience moving farm animals. We coordinated trailers and volunteers, helped her seek adoptive homes, and took the four in the worst shape home to the sanctuary.

Born with Blue were Blackie, Isis and Agnes, all of whom roam together with wagging, happy tails in their field at the sanctuary.

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